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Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Same story two takes...make that 4





Take 1




Man exonerated last year after 30 years on death row dies


SHREVEPORT, La. (AP) — A 65-year-old Shreveport man on death row for three decades before being exonerated last year has died.

An attorney for Glenn Ford told multiple media outlets that Ford died Monday. Ford had been diagnosed with lung cancer.

The attorney, William Most, says Ford had been the longest-serving death row inmate in the U.S. at the time of his release on March 10, 2014. Ford was found guilty in 1984 in the 1983 murder of a Shreveport jeweler, but his conviction was vacated after new evidence pointed to a different suspect in the killing.

After his release, Ford petitioned the state of Louisiana for compensation but was denied.

Ford, who resided in New Orleans after his release and until his death, is survived by several children and grandchildren living in California.

So you read this story and you say to yourself...Man did this poor bastard get screwed! 






Take 2




Exonerated convict Glenn Ford succumbs to lung cancer at 65


Glenn Ford, who spent nearly 30 years on Angola's death row for a murder that prosecutors eventually conceded he did not commit, died in New Orleans early Monday (June 29), supporters announced. He was 65.

Ford learned he had lung cancer shortly after his release from Angola on March 11, 2014. A news release from Ford's supporters said he died at 2:11 a.m., having been "surrounded by friends, loved ones and family in recent days."

Ford, who was born in Shreveport on Oct. 22, 1949, was convicted of the 1983 murder of 56-year-old Isadore Rozeman, a Shreveport jeweler and watchmaker for whom Ford had done occasional yard work. Ford had always denied killing Rozeman, and on March 10, 2014, he was exonerated of the crime when the state vacated his conviction.

State District Judge Ramona Emanuel voided Ford's conviction and sentence based on new information corroborating his claim that he was not present or involved in Rozeman's death, Ford's attorneys said.

Ford was tried and convicted of first-degree murder in 1984 and sentenced to death. He spent 29 years, three months and five days in solitary confinement on Angola's death row. At the time of his release, Ford was the longest-serving death row inmate in the United States, supporters said.

The final 15 months of Ford's life were spent outside prison walls but not without challenges.

Attorney General Buddy Caldwell's office filed a petition to deny Ford state-mandated compensation for his wrongful conviction and imprisonment, arguing Ford failed to meet the law's "factually innocent" clause. The provision requires petitioners to have not committed the crime for which they were originally convicted as well as "any crime based upon the same set of facts" used in the original conviction.

First Judicial District Court Judge Katherine Clark Dorroh sided with Caldwell in a ruling three months ago, deciding Ford was aware of the plan to rob Rozeman and failed to stop it, and took and sold items stolen during the robbery. The judge also ruled Ford tried to find buyers for the weapon used in Rozeman's murder, and that he tried to hinder the police investigation by initially giving a false name for the man he later identified as Rozeman's killer.

Ford died while awaiting the outcome of separate federal lawsuits aimed at securing compensation for his imprisonment and failing health, which he claimed resulted from insufficient medical treatment while in prison. Supporters said all he had received from the state before his death was $20 for a bus ride home from prison.

Supporters said Ford is survived by "several children" who live in California, and "more than 10 grandchildren."

A memorial service will be held at the Charbonnet Funeral Home at 1615 St. Philip St., but a date and time had not been immediately determined, supporters said. They asked that in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Ford's name to Resurrection After Exoneration at www.r-a-e.org. 


BTW...this is Glenn Ford... then and now.



It is interesting to note in only one of the 4 articles does it mention...[Ford was aware of the plan to rob Rozeman and failed to stop it, and took and sold items stolen during the robbery. The judge also ruled Ford tried to find buyers for the weapon used in Rozeman's murder, and that he tried to hinder the police investigation by initially giving a false name for the man he later identified as Rozeman's killer.]

Is this true? If it is he did exhibit at lease some culpability in the commission of this crime. I don't think to the tune of 30 years in jai was right. But why were they the only one to report it? Why did the others leave it out? 

Just something to think about.








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